(U.S.NAVY)Navy News Service: U.S. Navy sent this bulletin at 07/23/2013 06:31 AM EDT

Navy News Service
U.S. Navy sent this bulletin at 07/23/2013 06:31 AM EDT

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NNS130722-07. Navy Court Martial Results, Jan-June 2013
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=75513

NNS130721-01. Exercise Sea Breeze 2013 Draws to a Close
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=75504

NNS130720-08. US, Royal Australian Navy Complete TS 13 Torpedo Exercise
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=75499

NNS130722-10. USS Springfield Returns from Six-Month Deployment
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=75516

NNS130722-06. US, Japanese Citizens Gather for Naval Heritage and ‘A Celebration of Friendship’
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=75509

DNU — Camp Leatherneck Seabee Honors Deceased Father
http://www.navy.mil/viewVideo.asp?id=18673

NNS130722-02. Bonhomme Richard Participates in Beach Assault Exercise
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=75507

DNU — Navy Launches 2nd Mobile Communications Satellite
http://www.navy.mil/viewVideo.asp?id=18675

NNS130722-01. HMNZS Manawanui Concludes Participation in Pacific Partnership 2013
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=75505

DNU — Headlines for Monday, July 22, 2013: CNO Updates Status of the Navy
http://www.navy.mil/viewVideo.asp?id=18674

NNS130721-02. Sea Hawks Conduct Air Assault Exercise During Talisman Saber 2013
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=75503

NNS130720-07. Pacific Partnership 2013 Combat Engineers Honor Medal of Honor Recipient on Tarawa Atoll
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=75497

NNS130720-06. Combat Logistics Force Ships underway for Talisman Saber exercise
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=75489

NNS130720-05. USS Wasp Changes Command
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=75488

NNS130720-04. Nimitz Scores Above Average In Maintenance Inspection
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=75486

NNS130720-03. Lawrence Sailors Learn to Deal with Stress
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=75485

DNU — Navy Decommissions USS Reuben James
http://www.navy.mil/viewVideo.asp?id=18676

NNS130720-02. NAVMAG Indian Island Honors Veterans During Flag Ceremony
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=75484

NNS130720-01. Navy Lodge Everett Receives Carlson Award
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=75482

NNS130722-12. Current All Hands Update
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=75512

NNS020718-14. This Day in Naval History – July 22
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=2613

Eye on the Fleet – U.S. Navy Photo of The Day
http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=155770

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Sea Breeze 2013

Sea Breeze 2013

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U.S. Navy sent this bulletin at 07/23/2013 06:31 AM EDT
Navy News Service_U.S. Navy sent this bulletin at 07_23_2013 06;31 AM EDT
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ポートフォリオ_Navy News Service;_.U.S. Navy sent this bulletin at 07_23_2013 06;31 AM EDTpdf  PDF 12.9MB (23.060MB)

US, Japanese Citizens Gather for Naval Heritage and ‘A Celebration of Friend  PDF

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NNS130722-07. Navy Court Martial Results, Jan-June 2013

From Defense Media Activity-Navy

WASHINGTON (NNS) — The following reports the results of every Special and General Court-Martial convened within the United States Navy from January through June 2013. The cases are separated by the Navy Region in which they were tried.

http://www.navy.mil/docs/MasterCourtMartialSummariesRegionalized_01-062013.pdf
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NNS130721-01. Exercise Sea Breeze 2013 Draws to a Close

By By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jason Howard, U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa, U.S. 6th Fleet Public Affairs

ODESSA, Ukraine (NNS) — Exercise Sea Breeze 2013, the 16th iteration of the largest annual multinational maritime exercise in the Black Sea, ended July 20, as representatives from the 14 participating partner nations gathered together for the exercise closing ceremony.

Naval, air, and land forces from participating countries worked together both ashore and at sea from July 8-20 in order to strengthen interoperability and to improve maritime security.

“The military leadership of the fourteen nations that participated in Sea Breeze know that we can only improve as a cooperative team if we challenge ourselves,” said Capt. James Aiken, exercise deputy director. “Only then can we increase our cooperation and our interoperability as we become familiar with each other’s military operating procedures and practices.”

Much of the exercise focused on maritime interdiction operations as a primary means to enhance maritime security. The other key component was utilizing sea basing to conduct a range of operations ashore such as non-combatant evacuation to humanitarian assistance/disaster relief.

“The primary goal of the exercise has been achieved,” said Ukraine navy Rear Adm. Dennis Berezovsky, exercise director. “I am pleased that every partner’s efficiency, professionalism, and responsibility contributed to a great outcome. We all acquired new knowledge, skills, and experience in Sea Breeze.”
This year’s Sea Breeze increased in complexity by incorporating more real time operational challenges.

“We challenged the Sea Breeze participants by moving from scripted events to real time operations, requiring both operational and tactical decision making,” said Aiken. “As events occurred within the scenario, commanders at the operational and tactical level were called on to provide a plan of action for a response.

“I strongly believe we have been successful in continuing to grow our relationships with each other – relationships that, in the 16 years of Sea Breeze exercises, have been built through cooperation, strengthened through partnership, and affirmed through improved interoperability on the seas, over the land, and in the air.”

This year’s participants included Azerbaijan, Bulgaria, Canada, Georgia, Germany, Italy, Romania, Turkey, Ukraine and U.S., along with France, Libya, Qatar, and United Arab Emirates, as observers.

Sea Breeze 13, co-hosted by the Ukrainian and U.S. navies, aimed to improve maritime safety, security and stability engagements in the Black Sea by enhancing the capabilities of Partnership for Peace and Black Sea regional maritime security forces.

For more information, visit http://www.navy.mil, http://www.facebook.com/usnavy, or http://www.twitter.com/usnavy.

For more news from Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe and Africa/U.S. 6th Fleet, visit http://www.navy.mil/local/naveur/.
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NNS130720-08. US, Royal Australian Navy Complete TS 13 Torpedo Exercise

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kaitlyn R. Breitkreutz, USS Lassen Public Affairs

CORAL SEA (NNS) — The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Lassen (DDG 82) and a Royal Australian Navy (RAN) submarine participated in a torpedo exercise in the Coral Sea, July 19, in support of exercise Talisman Saber 2013 (TS 13).

TS 13 is a biennial training event aimed at improving Australian Defense Force (ADF) and U.S. combat readiness and interoperability as a Combined Joint Task Force.

“This has been a great opportunity for our Sailors to participate in realistic and relevant training for the forward-deployed region,” said Master Chief Jason Haka, command master chief aboard Lassen. “Everyone has given a 110 percent towards making everything run smoothly and I think it really showed out here today.”

The exercise gave more than 400 U.S. Navy and ADF crewmembers the opportunity to hone their skills and demonstrate their operating ability as a cohesive unit.

“We’re always looking for new, challenging exercises to take on,” said Cmdr. Scott McClelland, commanding officer of Lassen. “This training will only help to improve our war-fighting force and continue our commitment to the security interests of Australia.”

Other active participants in TS 13 included the George Washington Carrier Strike Group comprised of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73) with embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5, embarked Commander Destroyer Squadron 15, Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Antietam (CG 54), Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyers USS Preble (DDG 88), USS Momsen (DDG 92), USS Chung-Hoon (DDG 93) and the RAN guided-missile frigate HMAS Sydney (FFG 03).

For more information, visit http://www.navy.mil, http://www.facebook.com/usnavy, or http://www.twitter.com/usnavy.

For more news from Commander Task Force 70, visit http://www.navy.mil/local/ctf70/.
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NNS130722-10. USS Springfield Returns from Six-Month Deployment

By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class (SW/EXW) Jason J. Perry, Submarine Group 2 Public Affairs

GROTON, Conn. (NNS) — Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Springfield (SSN 761) returned to its homeport in Groton, Conn., July 22, after completing a scheduled six-month deployment.

Under the command of Cmdr. Chris Williams, Springfield transited more than 34,000 miles and conducted maritime operations in Europe and the Middle East in support of U.S. national security interests.

“The crew was privileged to serve as a forward deployed unit of our Navy,” said Williams. “They performed this duty admirably.”

Executive Officer Lt. Cmdr. Joe Lautenslager was also pleased with Springfield’s performance.

“The crew performed superbly in all mission areas during deployment,” Lautenslager said. “I am proud to have had the opportunity to serve with them.”

Springfield Sailors departed Naval Submarine Base New London in late January and now looks forward to reuniting with their loved ones.

“We plan to enjoy some well-earned time with our families,” said Williams.

The “first kiss” honor was awarded to Sarah Krueger, who welcomed her husband Electrician’s Mate 2nd Class (SS) Steven T. Krueger home.

The “first hug” was awarded to Chief Yeoman (SS) Aaron S. Norton’s three children – Ethan, Madison and Quinn.

Springfield qualified 25 enlisted Sailors and six commissioned officers in submarine warfare, a significant career milestone.

Enlisted crew members who qualify in submarines wear silver warfare pins known as silver dolphins. The officers’ warfare pins are gold.

Springfield was commissioned Jan. 9, 1993 and is the fourth Navy vessel to be named for cities in both Illinois and Massachusetts.

For more news from Commander Submarine Group 2, visit http://www.navy.mil/local/Subgru2/.
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NNS130722-06. US, Japanese Citizens Gather for Naval Heritage and ‘A Celebration of Friendship’

By Chief Mass Communication Specialist James E. Foehl, U.S. Naval War College Public Affairs

NEWPORT, R.I. (NNS) — President, U.S. Naval War College (NWC), Rear Adm. Walter E. “Ted” Carter, Jr., joined with distinguished guests of the Japanese-American Society of R.I. to participate in the 30th Black Ships Festival opening ceremony, “A Celebration of Friendship,” at Touro Park in Newport, R.I., July 19.

The opening ceremony provided an opportunity for official representatives and guests of the 30th Black Ships Festival to honor and celebrate American and Japanese history, culture and friendship.

A friendship formed as a result of Commodore Matthew C. Perry and his black ships expedition to the Far East in 1852.

The history of the Black Ships Festival originates with the Treaty of Kanagawa in 1854. Selected to lead an expedition to the Far East in 1852, Rhode Island’s Commodore Perry was bestowed full diplomatic powers in order to negotiate a treaty with Japan. The squadron of black-hulled ships and two steam ships, which bellowed “black” smoke, set anchor in what is now known as Tokyo Bay.

“Eighteen previous expeditions, including four from America, had failed to crack the Japanese wall of isolation,” said Carter. “Perry believed that the others’ failures had resulted from an insufficient show of strength and ignorance of Japanese character. Two mistakes he would never make.”

Following Perry’s arrival, he remained out-of-sight and in his cabin for five days, stating he would only consult personally with the emperor’s direct representatives.

“His strength and persistence eventually won out. On the 14th of July, the emperor’s barge sailed down from Tokyo bearing two imperial princes. They were met by a military formation of 400 fully armed Sailors and Marines in formal dress uniforms and spirited martial music played by the Navy band.

“Perry, attired in all his naval formality and finery, presented an imposing figure as he turned over letters to the princes for delivery to the emperor. These letters, from President [Millard] Fillmore and himself, were not treaties but promises of friendships, lists of advantages of trade with America and suggestion that a formal treaty be drafted.”

Perry promised to return the following year. When he returned, the Japanese were prepared to negotiate and the Treaty of Kanagawa was signed March 31, 1854. Under the terms of the agreement, American ships could now enter the ports of Hakodate and Shimoda to seek assistance and supplies. Additionally, American seaman would be protected in either port.

“It was these black ships, which added a significant page to the history of Japan,” read from the message sent by the Japanese Minister for Foreign Affairs, Fumio Kishida. “Japan and the U.S. have become irreplaceable partners as allies in the Asia Pacific region. Today’s Black Ships Festival is one of the best opportunities to remember the origin of Japan and U.S. relations.”

During the event, colors were paraded by the NWC color guard and U.S. and Japanese national anthems were played by Navy Band Northeast.

The event concluded with a ceremonial wreath-laying at the base of Perry’s statue at Touro Park from paired U.S. and Japanese representatives. The representatives then paid their respects with a salute or bow, signifying the understanding, cooperation and respect between the citizens of the U.S., Japan and Perry’s historic expedition.

For more news from Naval War College, visit http://www.navy.mil/local/nwc/.
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NNS130722-02. Bonhomme Richard Participates in Beach Assault Exercise

By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Matthew M. Bradley

USS BONHOMME RICHARD, At Sea (NNS) — The forward-deployed amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6) participated in a simulated beach assault as part of the biennial combined joint training exercise Talisman Saber 2013, July 20 and 21.

Marines and Sailors of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) embarked CH-53E Super Stallion helicopters, MV-22 Osprey tiltrotor aircraft, and landing craft air cushion (LCAC) to participate in the simulated assault from Bonhomme Richard.

Naval Beach Unit (NBU) 7 is in charge of the amphibious vehicles used in the assault and coordinated the safe landing of the crafts on the beach.

“NBU 7 provides an efficient ship to shore connector that supports movement of troops, vehicles, equipment and supplies ashore from shipping, through the surf zone, and across the beach,” said Lt. Mathew Buhn NBU 7 detachment officer in charge. “The landing craft crews and beachmasters work as a team to manage safe loading, unloading, transport, and movement of assets across the beach for further use by the MEU ashore.”

More than 400 Sailors and Marines were transported ashore via LCAC the first two days. Almost 200 Marines flew ashore via Super Stallion helicopters and Ospreys.

Bonhomme Richard’s air department helped support the assault by launching and recovering aircraft from the 31st MEU’s Air Combat Element while deck her department supported NBU-7 by launching and recovering LCACs.

Bonhomme Richard serves as a support platform for the MEU to project power ashore,” said Gunnery Sgt. Christopher Pearo, Bonhomme Richard’s combat cargo assistant. “By supporting the transportation of Marines ashore via air and surface movements, Bonhomme Richard and her crew performed superbly.”

Talisman Saber is a biennial exercise that enhances multilateral collaboration between U.S. and Australian forces for future combined operations, humanitarian assistance and natural disaster response. Over the course of Talisman Saber the Australian Defence Force works side-by-side United States Sailors and Marines, sharing information so that both countries can enhance their training and strengthen their military response.

The Bonhomme Richard Expeditionary Strike Group and the 31st MEU report to Commander, Amphibious Force 7th Fleet, Rear Adm. Jeffrey A. Harley, headquartered in White Beach, Okinawa, Japan.

For more information, visit http://www.navy.mil, http://www.facebook.com/usnavy, or http://www.twitter.com/usnavy.
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NNS130722-01. HMNZS Manawanui Concludes Participation in Pacific Partnership 2013

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Tim D. Godbee

TARAWA, Republic of Kiribati (NNS) — The Royal New Zealand Navy diving support vessel HMNZS Manawanui (A09) concluded its mission with Pacific Partnership 2013, July 21.

During its involvement, Manawanui and embarked personnel cleared more than 2,100 rounds of unexploded ordnance in the Solomon Islands and the Republic of Kiribati that remained behind from the battles of World War II.

“The types of ordnance ranged from basic hand grenades to 1,000 pound bombs,” said Royal New Zealand Navy Lt. Cmdr. Kerry Driver, Manawanui’s commanding officer. “Some were underwater, but most of them were on some of the outlying islands.”

Residents of island chains in Kiribati and the Solomon Islands sometimes fall victim to unexploded ordnance and can lose limbs or their lives, said Driver.

“We’re creating a safer environment for the local population,” said Driver. “Some of these explosive remnants of war are still dangerous and still explode every once in a while. We’re here to provide skills and tools to dispose of this ordnance.”

New Zealand Navy Midshipman David Dessoulavy said the opportunity to help people was gratifying and he learned a lot along the way.

“There are a lot of locals out there that are quite literally living on explosive mounds,” said Dessoulavy. “It’s rewarding for us to finally clear up the mess that was made a long time ago.”

A team of seven U.S. Navy explosive ordnance technicians joined Manawanui’s 23-person crew to aid in their efforts.

“It’s been an absolute treat working with them,” said Dessoulavy. “It’s been great having a different perspective from a different navy on how to do the job for the past two months.”

Conducted annually since 2006, Pacific Partnership is the largest disaster response-preparedness mission in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. Working at the invitation of each host nation, Pacific Partnership is conducted by partner nations that include Australia, Canada, Colombia, France, Japan, Malaysia Singapore, South Korea, New Zealand and the United States.

For more information, visit http://www.navy.mil, http://www.facebook.com/usnavy, or http://www.twitter.com/usnavy.
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NNS130721-02. Sea Hawks Conduct Air Assault Exercise During Talisman Saber 2013

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class(SW/AW) Andrew B. Church, NPASE East

CORAL SEA (NNS) — Sailors and Marines assigned to the Bonhomme Richard Expeditionary Strike Group (ESG) participated in a helicopter assault training exercise 20 and 21 July during the biennial multi-national exercise Talisman Saber 2013.
Over a 2-day period, more than six Navy and Marine aircraft conducted flight operations during the two-day event, which included Navy SH-60 Sea Hawks from Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 25, and Marine UH-1Y Venoms, AH-1W Super Cobras, MV-22 Ospreys, as well as over 400 Marine ground troops attached to the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU).
“The Island Knights helicopter squadron provides the expeditionary strike group with a remarkably flexible and lethal war fighting capability,” said Capt. Cathal O’Connor, commodore, Amphibious Squadron (PHIBRON) 11. “They support the entire kill chain: intelligence collection, surveillance and reconnaissance, airborne command and control, and all-weather delivery of personnel and precision ordnance. They are a true force-multiplier for this Blue-Green [Navy-Marine Corps] team.”
The purpose of the helicopter assault is to establish a force on a hostile shore, with the intent to introduce additional follow-on forces. The air assault exercise is intended to reinforce the skills necessary for the air and ground combat elements to do just that.
“The exercise as a whole tests our ability to organize, deploy, and control men and equipment during a simulated war,” said Lt. Brian Cramer, participating SH-60 Sea Hawk pilot attached to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 25. “The entire evolution was supported by rotary wing assets. [Rotary wing assets] can put Marines on the ground at a specific location for an assault, support them, and then extract all of them after the mission is accomplished.”
SH-60 Sea Hawks serve as an over-watch for the operation by gathering intelligence and surveillance and reconnaissance, and disseminating that information to ground troops.
“[Piloting the Sea Hawk], I park at high altitude and observe what’s happening on the ground,” said Cramer. “I can call out any sort of hazards or enemy troop movements that might be occurring so the mission commanders can take appropriate action.”
The air assault is just one of the training evolutions the Bonhomme Richard ESG is completing during Talisman Saber, an exercise which enhances multilateral collaboration between U.S. and Australian forces for future combined operations, humanitarian assistance, and natural disaster response.
The Island Knights of HSC 25 are under the command of Capt. Cathal O’Connor, commodore, Amphibious Squadron (PHIBRON) 11 who reports to Commander, Amphibious Force 7th Fleet Rear Adm. Jeffrey A. Harley, the ESG commander for exercise Talisman Saber 2013
For more news about PHIBRON 11 or the Bonhomme Richard ESG, please visit:
http://www.facebook.com/#!/PHIBRON11
http://www.cpr11.navy.mil/
http://www.dvidshub.net/unit/PHIBRON11
http://www.cpf.navy.mil
http://www.c7f.navy.mil

For more information, visit http://www.navy.mil, http://www.facebook.com/usnavy, or http://www.twitter.com/usnavy.

For more news from Navy Public Affairs Support Element, Norfolk, visit http://www.navy.mil/local/pacennorfolk/.
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NNS130720-07. Pacific Partnership 2013 Combat Engineers Honor Medal of Honor Recipient on Tarawa Atoll

By Chief Mass Communication Specialist Chris Fowler, NPASE West

TARAWA, Republic of Kiribati (NNS) — A U.S. Marine Corps combat engineer humanitarian assistance survey team (HAST), in conjunction with Pacific Partnership 2013, conducted a memorial ceremony on Betio Island, part of Tarawa Atoll in the Republic of Kiribati, July 19, to honor one of their own.

While other members of Pacific Partnership conducted health fairs, community service and engineering events, a small group of seven Marines and one Sailor stood in the entrance to a World War II Japanese bunker just off of what was strategically known as Red Beach Three. There, HAST Officer in Charge, U.S. Marine Corps 2nd Lt. Mike Wisotzkey, Alpha Company, 9th Engineer Support Battalion called his team to attention while he read a citation for the highest honor bestowed upon U.S. service members, the Medal of Honor.
“The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Medal of Honor posthumously to 1st Lt. Alexander Bonnyman, Jr … for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as Executive Officer of the 2d Battalion Shore Party, 8th Marines, 2d Marine Division, during the assault against enemy Japanese-held Tarawa in the Gilbert Islands, 20-22 November 1943 …”
After the recitation, while the Marines quietly explored the bunker now located innocuously behind a police station, Wisotzkey explained more about his team and why they were on Tarawa Atoll.

“This is a Marine Forces Pacific initiative. This team’s primary mission is to conduct humanitarian assistance surveys on various outlying islands and visit, and rehabilitate, the different war memorials,” Wisotzkey said.

“But when we found out we were visiting Tarawa, we knew we wanted to do something special,” Wisotzkey said. “Lieutenant Bonnyman was one of us, he was a combat engineer.”

HAST member, U.S. Navy Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Ricardo Alonsolopez described the visit as being, “Once in a lifetime.

“The Marines got stuck on a coral reef and had to wade ashore under heavy fire from the Japanese,” Alonsolopez said. “There were many casualties. So for these Marines, and for me as a hospital corpsman, these sites are part of our heritage. This is all very meaningful.”

For another Marine, Pvt. Taylor Pittman, 9th Engineer Support Battalion, standing in the bunker and seeing first hand the unexploded ordnance scattered on the ground touched more than his sense of patriotism, it touched his sense of family.

“My great uncle fought here, on Tarawa.” Pittman said. “I never got to meet him; he died years later fighting in Korea. But I can’t help but wonder, ‘Did he fight here, at this exact bunker. Was he standing where I am standing?'”

Looking around at the bunker and the rubble scattered on the ground Pittman said, seemingly to himself, “This is so unreal.”

Conducted annually since 2006, Pacific Partnership is the largest disaster response-preparedness mission in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. Working at the invitation of each host nation, Pacific Partnership is joined by partner nations that include Australia, Canada, Colombia, France, Japan, Malaysia Singapore, South Korea and New Zealand.

For more information, visit http://www.navy.mil, http://www.facebook.com/usnavy, or http://www.twitter.com/usnavy.

For more news from Navy Public Affairs Support Element West, visit http://www.navy.mil/local/pacensandiego/.
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NNS130720-06. Combat Logistics Force Ships underway for Talisman Saber exercise

By Ed Baxter, MSC Far East Public Affairs

CORAL SEA (NNS) — Navy Combat Logistics Force ships USNS Charles Drew (T-AKE 10), USNS Wally Schirra (T-AKE 8) and USNS Yukon (T-AO 202) are steaming off the coast of northeastern Australia this week, providing vital logistics support to U.S. and Australian ships participating in Talisman Saber 2013.

Thousands of U.S. and Australian military forces took to the air, land, and sea in and around northeastern Australia for the two-week exercise. Operating as a Combined Joint Task Force, Talisman Saber 2013 focuses on combined operations, as well as responding to humanitarian emergencies or natural disasters. The exercise includes both live and computer-simulated scenarios.

CLF ships are shadowing vessels from the USS George Washington Carrier Strike Group and USS Bonhomme Richard Amphibious Ready Group, which will conduct bilateral training with ships from the Royal Australian Navy.

USNS Charles Drew conducted its first underway replenishment operation with Australian fleet replenishment oiler HMAS Sirius (O-266) July 18. CLF ships are also scheduled to resupply Royal Australian Navy light cruisers HMAS Perth (D-29) and HMAS Sydney (D-48).

CLF ships’ role in the exercise will conclude July 29.

Personnel from Singapore based Military Sealift Command Far East’s logistics directorate work closely with counterparts from Australia’s navy throughout the exercise. MSCFE’s Combat Logistics Force officers – who operate a centralized, one-stop shop for Navy combat logistics force ships – manage the delivery of commodities to both U.S. Navy and Australian ships at sea.

Jointly sponsored by the U.S. Pacific Command and ADF headquarters Joint Operational Command, Talisman Saber 20l3 will incorporate U.S. Army, Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force, the ADF, as well as other government agencies from each country.

MSC operates approximately 110 noncombatant, U.S. Navy civilian-crewed ships that replenish U.S. Navy ships, conduct specialized missions, strategically preposition combat cargo at sea around the world, and move military cargo and supplies used by deployed U.S. forces and coalition partners.

For more information, visit http://www.navy.mil, http://www.facebook.com/usnavy, or http://www.twitter.com/usnavy.

For more news from Military Sealift Command, visit http://www.navy.mil/local/MSC/.
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NNS130720-05. USS Wasp Changes Command

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Michael T. Forbes II

USS Wasp (LHD 1) Public Affairs

NORFOLK (NNS) — The crew of amphibious assault ship USS Wasp (LHD 1) held a change of command ceremony in Norfolk, July 18.

Capt. Brian Teets relieved Capt. Gary Boardman as the commanding officer of Wasp in a time honored ceremony held in the hangar bay.

“I would like to thank the crew for their outstanding hard work and dedication throughout my time as commanding officer of Wasp,” said Boardman. “We had a very demanding schedule over the past couple of years, but I was continually impressed by the teamwork and ‘can-do’ attitude displayed by all. This crew has made some real impacts to our nation’s defense and should be very proud of their selfless service.”

Under Boardman’s command, Wasp earned the Battle “E” after participating in exercises and events during 2012 which include: Bold Alligator 2012, Fleet Ex 2012, Defense Support of Civil Authorities after Hurricane Sandy, and Fleet Weeks in New Orleans, Port Everglades, Fla., New York, and Boston. During Boardman’s time aboard Wasp, the ship conducted the first at sea launch and recovery of the highly anticipated F-35B Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF).

Boardman will next serve as the chief of staff for Expeditionary Strike Group 2 in Virginia Beach, Va.

Under Teets’ command, Wasp will continue to operate as the test platform for JSF.

“I am extremely honored and humbled to serve as the next commanding officer of this great warship. I would like to thank the officers and crew of Wasp for their continued hard work and commitment,” said Teets. “Because of this outstanding crew, I am confident Wasp’s legacy of excellence will continue as we return her to the combat deployment rotation.”

Teets, a native of Urbana, Ohio, received his commission March 1990 through the Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps program at Ohio State University, where he earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Production and Operations Management. His previous assignments include Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light (HSL) 44, HSL-4, HSL-37, and USS Enterprise (CVN 65). Teets reported to Wasp in December 2011 as the executive officer.

Wasp is scheduled to begin a maintenance period while in dry dock this fall after completing an underway for JSF testing.

For more news from Commander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet, visit http://www.navy.mil/local/surflant/.
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NNS130720-04. Nimitz Scores Above Average In Maintenance Inspection

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Aiyana Paschal, USS Nimitz (CVN 68) Public Affairs

USS NIMITZ, At Sea (NNS) — A maintenance and material management inspection (3MI) was conducted July 16-18 aboard aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68).

The 17 team members from Commander, Naval Air Forces 3M Team, concluded the inspection July 18. Nimitz performed well with an above average score of 90.92 percent. The 3MI ensured Nimitz personnel are conducting maintenance properly and in accordance with instructions.

“3MI is basically the 3M inspection that is required every 18 months by the Commander, Naval Air Forces, and they do it on board all carriers throughout the fleet,” said Lt. Cmdr. Harold Honeycutt, the 3M officer aboard Nimitz. “It validates that the ship is conducting maintenance by the instruction the correct way and writing jobs, as they should, to maintain the ship. The ship has to last a long time, so if they do the maintenance properly the ship will meet or exceed its planned life.”

While 3MIs are required every 18 months, this was the first inspection conducted utilizing the program SKED 3.2 as opposed to SKED 3.1. A relatively new version, Sked 3.2 tracks and schedules all of the ship’s maintenance.

Although converting to a newer system was a challenge for both personnel aboard Nimitz and the inspection team, there are many benefits to SKED 3.2 that make it a much more efficient program than SKED 3.1, Honeycutt said.

“The great thing about SKED 3.2 is it details maintenance down to the component vice down to just the system,” said Honeycutt. “The new system automatically schedules checks for you; both by periodicity and then for special evolutions. We can put out global triggers, which will be specific checks for whatever the event is; say prior to getting under way, after pulling into port, after a fire drill. We have triggers we can send out and it populates maintenance throughout different areas of the ship.”

Learning the new program was a part of preparing for the inspection for everyone from the maintenance person conducting maintenance, up to the 3M Officer.
“I firmly believe SKED 3.2 is a great program,” said Information Systems Technician 2nd Class Robert O’Mara, a combat systems work center supervisor. “As far as management goes, it’s a lot better. It’s a lot less paper work for work center supervisors and maintenance people.”

In order to prepare for the 3MI, O’Mara and all other work center supervisors went through training to become efficient in SKED 3.2.

“It was a challenge at first, but now once you get everything programmed in there, it’s a really easy program to use,” said O’Mara.

Along with confirming the ship’s ability to perform maintenance on its equipment, the 3MI results are a factor determining whether Nimitz receives the coveted Battle “E” award.

“The inspection affects us because if you do not pass the 3MI, that’s one of the things that will prevent you from getting the Battle ‘E’ for the ship, so this is a big step in that,” said Master Chief Hull Maintenance Technician David Conduff, the ship’s 3M coordinator. “More importantly, what it really shows is how the ship is doing for its maintenance overall. As it’s been said time and time again, we’re supposed to keep this ship lasting up to 50 years. The only way to do that is by performing the proper maintenance on it.”
While there were challenges along the way, Nimitz proved to be steadfast with its above-average score on the 3MI.

“We know for sure that we’re in far better shape now than we were a year ago, even though there are things we need to improve on,” said Honeycutt. “The goal is for this to be used as a starting point and for us to get better and better.”

Nimitz Strike Group is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom.

For more information, visit http://www.navy.mil, http://www.facebook.com/usnavy, or http://www.twitter.com/usnavy.

For more news from USS Nimitz (CVN 68), visit http://www.navy.mil/local/cvn68/.
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NNS130720-03. Lawrence Sailors Learn to Deal with Stress

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Carla Ocampo

U.S. FIFTH FLEET AREA OF REPONSIBILITY (NNS) — Sailors aboard guided missile-destroyer USS William P. Lawrence (DDG 110) attended stress-control training July 15-18.

Lt. Benjamin Box, a chaplain assigned to Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 23, conducted the training. He covered topics like the negative and positive ways to deal with stress and how it can affect Sailors’ daily lives and relationships.

Box explained that stress is a normal part of life, especially when deployed. It is important that Sailors learn to manage it in a positive way.

“There are many ways Sailors can deal with stress and it is different for every individual,” said Box. “They can talk to someone about their problems, write them down, play video games and work out. Sailors are not powerless against stress.”

For many Sailors it was refreshing to hear that stress is a part of everyone’s life and they are not the only ones going through it.

“I attended the training because we all do get stressed,” said Fire Controlman 3rd Class Raynaldo Caver. “Stress can take a toll on your relationships with your shipmates and family and friends back home. I learned ways to better deal with it and not let it get the best of me.”

Box said that Sailors should not be afraid to ask for help. Holding it in will only make it worse and send Sailors down a downward spiral, he added.
“It is important that Sailors know their resources,” said Box. “They can talk to their chain of command, a chaplain, fleet and family support center and military one source. Sailors need to recognize that they are not alone.”

Lawrence is deployed with Carrier Strike Group 11 in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom.

For more information, visit http://www.navy.mil, http://www.facebook.com/usnavy, or http://www.twitter.com/usnavy.

For more news from USS Nimitz (CVN 68), visit http://www.navy.mil/local/cvn68/.
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NNS130720-02. NAVMAG Indian Island Honors Veterans During Flag Ceremony

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Chris Brown, Navy Public Affairs Support Element West, Det. Northwest

INDIAN ISLAND, Wash. (NNS) — Sailors and DoD civilians on Naval Magazine Indian Island (NMII) participated in a flag ceremony July 18, honoring veterans from Seaport Landing Retirement and Assisted Living Community in Port Townsend, Wash.

Cmdr. Michael Yesunas, commanding officer, NMII, presented a flag that was flown over Forward Operating Base Wright in Asadabad, Afghanistan July 4, 2012, and then flown again at NMII July 18.

“We cannot rightfully enjoy our freedom today without remembering the great price our veterans paid for that freedom,” said Yesunas. “The American flag represents that freedom and the unwavering dedication the men and women of our military have to preserving that freedom. I wanted to do something to remind them that their service is not forgotten.”

Accepting the flag on behalf of the veterans in attendance was World War II veteran 2nd Class Medic Ed Adams.

“This is really a huge thrill,” said Adams. “I have always admired Indian Island and they have always been good to us. We are going to take special care of this flag.”

The veterans also received a tour of the base lead by Yesunas.

“We feel honored and grateful of the way they take care of the veterans in our area,” said Sandi Eisenman, activity director, Seaport Landing Retirement and Assisted Living Community. “The veterans are really proud of their service and I am thankful they were able to receive this gift and recognition from Commander Yesunas.”

NMII also holds monthly visits to the Seaport Landing Retirement and Assisted Living Community called “Commander’s Breakfast.” The monthly visits are a way for veterans and current Sailors stationed on NMII to share stories and experiences with each other.

For more information, visit http://www.navy.mil, http://www.facebook.com/usnavy, or http://www.twitter.com/usnavy.
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NNS130720-01. Navy Lodge Everett Receives Carlson Award

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jeffry Willadsen, Navy Public Affairs Support Element West, Det. Everett

MARYSVILLE, Wash. (NNS) — Staff members at the Navy Lodge Everett at Smokey Point, Naval Station Everett (NSE) Support Complex, accepted the 2012 Edward E. Carlson Award for superior performance during a ceremony July 18.

The Carlson Award is presented each year to the Navy Lodge that demonstrated superior performance in service, operations, leadership, and both guest and associate satisfaction.

“The Navy Lodge plays a critical role in helping to keep our forward deployed Navy and Marine Corps focused on their mission,” said Capt. James Duke, commanding officer, NSE. “The world-class, superior hospitality that [staff] provide our guests, our service members and their families on a day-to-day basis supports the readiness of our warfighters and the security of our nation.”

Based on guest surveys, associate feedback, inspections, and other data the Navy’s 42 Navy Lodges competed to be the best in the medium-sized category.

“Our Navy Lodge program is an important quality of life benefit and its one that we’re proud to deliver to our deserving Sailors and their families,” said Robert Bianchi, chief executive officer, Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM). “Associates of the Navy Lodge Everett take this responsibility very seriously.”

During the ceremony, both Duke and Bianchi credited the staff members at Navy Lodge Everett as instrumental in making it one of the most successful Navy Lodges in the world. It was the labors of this team that made Navy Lodge Everett such a clean, comfortable, and friendly environment.

“I’m honored to have this award,” said Dominic Lewis, Navy Lodge Everett’s manager. “I’m proud of my team and proud to support this base as home away from home to our military and their families.”

All of the associates of Navy Lodge Everett received awards or certificates to honor their contribution to the Navy Lodge’s success.

The Carlson Award is named in honor of Edward E. Carlson, a former member of the Secretary of the Navy’s Exchange/Commissary Advisory Committee. Carlson’s leadership and guidance made the Navy Lodge Program the world-class hospitality service to military members that it is today.

For more information, visit http://www.navy.mil, http://www.facebook.com/usnavy, or http://www.twitter.com/usnavy.

For more news from Navy Public Affairs Support Element West, Det. Northwest, visit http://www.navy.mil/local/nwpacen/.

NNS130722-12. Current All Hands Update

From Defense Media Activity – Navy

WASHINGTON (NNS) — All Hands Update features two newscasts today – two one-minute newscasts.

Two-minute newscast-
– Camp Leatherneck Seabee Honors Deceased Father
http://www.navy.mil/viewVideo.asp?id=18673

First One-minute newscast-
– Headlines for Monday, July 22, 2013: CNO Updates Status of the Navy
http://www.navy.mil/viewVideo.asp?id=18674

Second one-minute newscast-
– Navy Launches 2nd Mobile Communications Satellite
http://www.navy.mil/viewVideo.asp?id=18675

Third one-minute newscast-
– Navy Decommissions USS Reuben James
http://www.navy.mil/viewVideo.asp?id=18676

Defense Media Activity – Navy usually produces four All Hands Update (AHU)newscasts each day – one two-minute newscast and three one-minute newscasts. AHU can be seen throughout the day and evening on the Direct-to-Sailor (DTS)satellite television service available aboard 160 ships of the fleet and via the Navy Web site at http://www.navy.mil. Check your local DTS program schedule for air times. AHU can also be seen throughout the world on the American Forces Radio and Television Service (AFRTS).

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NNS020718-14. This Day in Naval History – July 22

From the Navy News Service

1802 – Frigate Constellation defeats 9 Corsair gunboats off Tripoli.
1905 – Body of John Paul Jones moved to Annapolis, MD for reburial.
1953 – U.S. ships laid down heavy barrage to support UN troops in Korea
1964 – Four Navy Divers (LCDR Robert Thompson, MC; Gunners Mate First Class Lester Anderson, Chief Quartermaster Robert A. Barth, and Chief Hospital Corpsman Sanders Manning) submerge in Sealab I for 10 days at a depth of 192 feet, 39 miles off Hamilton, Bermuda. They surfaced on July 31.
1974 – Evacuees from the coup on Cyprus arrive on board Navy vessels in the Mediterranean. Operation ended on July 24.

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Navy News Service is the official news wire service of the U.S. Navy, containing stories recently posted to the Navy Web site at http://www.navy.mil. It is a product of the Defense Media Navy – 6700 Taylor Rd., Fort Meade, MD 20755. Reprints should be credited to the Navy News Service (NNS).

For the latest in Navy news from around the fleet, visit http://www.navy.mil.

For all Navy-related questions, review the FAQs posted at http://www.navy.mil or visit http://www.history.navy.mil.

Media queries should be directed to the Navy News Desk at (703) 697-5342.
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US, Japanese Citizens Gather for Naval Heritage and ‘A Celebration of Friendship’

Story Number: NNS130722-06Release Date: 7/22/2013 9:30:00 AM
By Chief Mass Communication Specialist James E. Foehl, U.S. Naval War College Public Affairs

NEWPORT, R.I. (NNS) — President, U.S. Naval War College (NWC), Rear Adm. Walter E. “Ted” Carter, Jr., joined with distinguished guests of the Japanese-American Society of R.I. to participate in the 30th Black Ships Festival opening ceremony, “A Celebration of Friendship,” at Touro Park in Newport, R.I., July 19.

The opening ceremony provided an opportunity for official representatives and guests of the 30th Black Ships Festival to honor and celebrate American and Japanese history, culture and friendship.

A friendship formed as a result of Commodore Matthew C. Perry and his black ships expedition to the Far East in 1852.

The history of the Black Ships Festival originates with the Treaty of Kanagawa in 1854. Selected to lead an expedition to the Far East in 1852, Rhode Island’s Commodore Perry was bestowed full diplomatic powers in order to negotiate a treaty with Japan. The squadron of black-hulled ships and two steam ships, which bellowed “black” smoke, set anchor in what is now known as Tokyo Bay.

“Eighteen previous expeditions, including four from America, had failed to crack the Japanese wall of isolation,” said Carter. “Perry believed that the others’ failures had resulted from an insufficient show of strength and ignorance of Japanese character. Two mistakes he would never make.”

Following Perry’s arrival, he remained out-of-sight and in his cabin for five days, stating he would only consult personally with the emperor’s direct representatives.

“His strength and persistence eventually won out. On the 14th of July, the emperor’s barge sailed down from Tokyo bearing two imperial princes. They were met by a military formation of 400 fully armed Sailors and Marines in formal dress uniforms and spirited martial music played by the Navy band.

“Perry, attired in all his naval formality and finery, presented an imposing figure as he turned over letters to the princes for delivery to the emperor. These letters, from President [Millard] Fillmore and himself, were not treaties but promises of friendships, lists of advantages of trade with America and suggestion that a formal treaty be drafted.”

Perry promised to return the following year. When he returned, the Japanese were prepared to negotiate and the Treaty of Kanagawa was signed March 31, 1854. Under the terms of the agreement, American ships could now enter the ports of Hakodate and Shimoda to seek assistance and supplies. Additionally, American seaman would be protected in either port.

“It was these black ships, which added a significant page to the history of Japan,” read from the message sent by the Japanese Minister for Foreign Affairs, Fumio Kishida. “Japan and the U.S. have become irreplaceable partners as allies in the Asia Pacific region. Today’s Black Ships Festival is one of the best opportunities to remember the origin of Japan and U.S. relations.”

During the event, colors were paraded by the NWC color guard and U.S. and Japanese national anthems were played by Navy Band Northeast.

The event concluded with a ceremonial wreath-laying at the base of Perry’s statue at Touro Park from paired U.S. and Japanese representatives. The representatives then paid their respects with a salute or bow, signifying the understanding, cooperation and respect between the citizens of the U.S., Japan and Perry’s historic expedition.

For more news from Naval War College, visit www.navy.mil/local/nwc/.

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