(U.S.NAVY)Navy News Service: U.S. Navy sent this bulletin at 07/26/2013 06:31 AM EDT

Navy News Service:
U.S. Navy sent this bulletin at 07/26/2013 06:31 AM EDT
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NNS130725-23. Navy Ensign Responds Quickly to Partial Amputee Victim
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=75575

NNS130725-25. Naval Station Mayport Hosts ‘No Zebras, No Excuses’ Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Training
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=75584

NNS130725-01. Asheville Visits Yokosuka during Western Pacific Deployment
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=75564

DNU — George Washington Welcomes Visitors From Australia
http://www.navy.mil/viewVideo.asp?id=18689

DNU — FLTCM April Beldo Discusses Post 9/11 G.I. Bill Transferability
http://www.navy.mil/viewVideo.asp?id=18693

NNS130725-04. Save A Life Tour Stops At Naval Base San Diego
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=75557

NNS130725-21. Newport NDAAC Counselors Promote Importance of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=75582

NNS130725-22. Industry, Navy Leaders Headline “IdeaFest: Hampton Roads”
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=75581

NNS130725-30. Pacific Partnership Hosts Disaster Response Workshop
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=75588

DNU — Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 25 Volunteers at Guam High School
http://www.navy.mil/viewVideo.asp?id=18694

DNU — Jacksonville High School Students Learn About Medicine Through Naval Hospital Mentor Program
http://www.navy.mil/viewVideo.asp?id=18695

NNS130725-13. Naval Hospital Jacksonville Provides Mentorship to High School Students
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=75570

NNS130725-10. SEALs and SWCCs Support National Boy Scout Jamboree
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=75568

NNS130725-06. Lincoln Leads the Way in Hearing Conservation
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=75560

NNS130725-20. Vice Adm. Branch Takes Charge of Information Dominance and Naval Intelligence
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=75580

NNS130725-07. Submarine School Holds Changes of Command
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=75569

NNS130725-05. Former USS Solace Survivor Laid to Rest
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=75565

NNS130725-26. Naval Academy Sailor Receives Purple Heart
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=75585

NNS130725-15. Obangame Express 2014 Planning Commences in Ghana
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=75572

NNS130725-08. NAVFAC Networks to Provide Business Opportunities in the 11th Annual Hawaii Small Business Forum
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=75558

DNU — George Washington Sailors Complete Security Force Reaction Training
http://www.navy.mil/viewVideo.asp?id=18692

NNS130725-18. Current All Hands Update
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=75578

NNS020718-15. This Day in Naval History – July 25
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=2616

Eye on the Fleet – U.S. Navy Photo of The Day
http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=156054

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Navy News Service_U.S. Navy sent this bulletin at 07_26_2013 06;31 AM EDT
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NNS130725-23. Navy Ensign Responds Quickly to Partial Amputee Victim

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SCW/SW/AW) Jonathan Pankau, Defense Media Activity

GAITHERSBURG, Md. (NNS) — A Navy ensign and Army second lieutenant leapt into action to save the life of a man who lost part of his leg when a car careened into the Sam’s Club in Gaithersburg, Md., July 23.

He owes his life, or at least a few quarts of blood, to Ensign John Hunt from Cypress, Calif., and 2nd Lt. Wells Weymouth from Tampa, Fla.

Both men are students at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS) campus at Bethesda, Md. They learned the life-saving techniques applied on the injured from passing the Operational Emergency Medical Skills (OEMS) course at USUHS.

Hunt and Weymouth were exiting the Sam’s Club after gathering supplies for the classroom when Subinoy Mazumdar crashed his Buick into the store.

“We hear this giant explosion and we look over and there’s just dust coming out of the concession stand and then a car coming at maybe 30 miles per hour into Sam’s club,” said Hunt. “We hear screaming, a lot of noise, a lot of running around and the car eventually stops against a pallet of Gatorade, and I see two people go down immediately. My first reaction was probably, Oh my God, what’s going on here? And then I looked over at Wells and we were like, let’s get in there.”

Hunt and Weymouth said they immediately responded to Dimas M. Chavez, the partial amputee, applying direct pressure above the wound and grabbing as many belts as they could to be used for emergency tourniquets.

“His leg was almost completely off, completely shattered the bone and he was bleeding profusely,” said Hunt. “The wartime injuries we’re accustomed to in this course we’re taking, I felt like it was a casualty in Sam’s Club; it was so bad.”

Hunt and Weymouth passed the USHUS OEMS course little more than a week before the incident, and they both agreed that the speed and efficiency they exhibited while treating the victim’s injuries were due to the skills acquired from the course.

“I felt like we were exposed to great training with the OEMS course and we just acted on instinct and just got in there really quick,” said Hunt. “I felt confident enough to get in there, I did. I felt like even before the course two weeks ago I probably couldn’t have done that, at least not in the time that I did.”

Everyone injured in the incident is currently in stable condition, but Sam’s Club Store Manager Mark Sohm said he wasn’t sure that Chavez would have made it to the hospital without the well-trained, instantaneous response from the two service members.

“I was in the office and heard the crash and went to the scene of the accident. There was an individual down with a leg that was in pretty poor shape,” said Sohm. “The soldier and Sailor quickly addressed the situation. They asked for belts, they put it around the top of the wound, immediately addressed the situation. It was extremely impressive.”

Sohm served in the Marine Corps Reserves for 14 years, and said he served with corpsmen in Iraq. They always looked out for the Marines in similar situations, and Sohm said that’s what he saw at the scene of the crash, and described it as the same type of feeling and same type of camaraderie.

“The important thing with the soldier and Sailor was they led by example,” said Sohm. “Where other people didn’t know or react, their military training immediately went into effect. It was a good reflection to the community, to everyone shopping here, about the military itself, and a pretty heroic action.”

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NNS130725-25. Naval Station Mayport Hosts ‘No Zebras, No Excuses’ Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Training

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Salt Cebe, Navy Public Affairs Support Element Southeast

MAYPORT, Fla. (NNS) — More than 400 Sailors from Naval Station Mayport attended a unique ‘No Zebras, No Excuses’ training session on Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR), July 24.

The ‘No Zebras, No Excuses’ program, features Steve Thompson, an educator from Central Michigan University and is sponsored by the Department of the Navy’s SAPR Office. The program featured skits designed to raise awareness and show service members how they can help prevent sexual assaults.

“The zebra represents a bystander,” said Thompson. “This all came about by accident one day while I was watching television. There was a lion chasing a herd of zebras. After the lion took one of the zebras down, just in the background was the rest of the zebra herd acting as if nothing had happened.”

Thompson said the next day that another zebra was brought down and he noticed the zebras were still just standing there.

“If I was one of those zebras, I’d kick some lion butt,” Thompson said.

The skits showed how many sexual assaults occur when the victim is comfortable with the predator who is usually someone they trust. They also showed how alcohol or drugs could be used to take advantage of another individual.

During the program, Sailors were asked to close their eyes and visualize four women they care about, and think about how they would feel if one of them was sexually assaulted.

“When he said to think about four females that you know, that actually struck a chord with me,” said Electrician’s Mate 1st Class Marlon Santiago. “I have four females that are really close to me. Thompson was talking about how his daughter got raped but she was scared to tell him about it. That really got to me because it could have been one of my daughters who are too scared to tell anybody.”

Sailors who attended the event said they felt empowered by the information they gained during the program.

“The problem is, nobody wants to get involved when someone is getting sexual assaulted,” said Boatswain’s Mate 2nd Class Ruben Benders. “People just walk away or look the other way. If we can stop doing that – if we can stop it from happening by getting involved there will be fewer incidents.”

The “No Zebras, No Excuses” program is being presented at all major Navy installations in the Southeast region.

For more information, visit http://www.navy.mil, http://www.facebook.com/usnavy, or http://www.twitter.com/usnavy.
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NNS130725-01. Asheville Visits Yokosuka during Western Pacific Deployment

From Lt. j.g. Dartanyon King, USS Asheville

YOKOSUKA, Japan (NNS) — The Los Angeles-class fast attack submarine USS Asheville (SSN 758) arrived at Fleet Activities Yokosuka July 24 for a visit as part of its deployment to the Western Pacific.

With a crew of approximately 147, Asheville will conduct a multitude of missions and showcase the latest capabilities of the submarine fleet.

“I am very proud of my talented crew aboard Asheville,” said Cmdr. Douglas Bradley, Asheville’s commanding officer. “They have worked extremely hard thus far maintaining maritime security operations in the Western Pacific. It is great to be back in Japan to experience the wonderful culture and to give my crew the rest that they deserve.”

Asheville is the 47th Los Angeles-class nuclear powered fast attack submarine. Some features of Asheville include the submarine advanced combat control system, advanced rapid commercial off-the-shelf insertion sonar system, and superior electronic support measures capability. In addition to these tactical advances, retractable bow planes and a hardened sail provide the capability of operating freely in any of the world’s oceans, including the Arctic Basin.

“The crew has done great things for their country,” said Master Chief Roger Skeens, Asheville’s chief of the boat. “This port visit to Yokosuka will allow us to recharge and continue on with deployment.”

This is Asheville’s seconnd time visiting Yokosuka this deployment.

“I am excited to pull into Yokosuka again, represent the United States and get the chance to climb Mt. Fuji,” said Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Andrew Blalock, Asheville Sailor of the Year.

Measuring more than 360 feet long and weighing more than 6,900 tons when submerged, Asheville is one of the stealthiest, fast attack submarines in the world. This submarine is capable of supporting a multitude of missions including anti-submarine warfare, anti-surface ship warfare, strike, naval special warfare involving special operations forces, and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance.
Asheville is home ported in San Diego, Calif., and is part of Submarine Squadron 11.

Asheville is always on call and ready to successfully complete all missions, “From the mountains, to the seas!!”

For more news from Commander Submarine Group 7, visit http://www.navy.mil/local/csg7/.
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NNS130725-04. Save A Life Tour Stops At Naval Base San Diego

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Bradley J. Gee, Navy Public Affairs Support Element West

SAN DIEGO (NNS) — The national Save A Life Tour (SALT) alcohol-awareness program educated Sailors on the effects of drinking and driving at the Naval Base San Diego base theater, July 23.

The tour features a simulator which allows participants to experience the vision and steering reactions of a person who is driving while intoxicated.

“The simulator experience was pretty good,” said Gunner’s Mate 3rd Class Hugo Pineda. “I found out that it was a lot more difficult to steer after the blood alcohol content level increased. It makes it harder to drive.”

The event also included a graphic video that showed the potential outcomes of drinking and driving, followed by a personal story from a SALT representative who explained how a drunk driver affected his life.

“Back in the day people were cut a lot of slack and that won’t happen in today’s Navy,” said Master Chief Yeoman Kevin Murray from Navy Mobilization Processing Site San Diego. “In the past year I’ve seen three different incidents and basically it ruined their careers. The Navy keeps saying it’s not worth it, you can lose your career because of a bad choice. You’ve earned it, keep it. I strongly believe that.”

The Navy’s Keep What You’ve Earned campaign encourages Sailors to drink responsibly. Recognition of their work ethic and achievements reminds Sailors of how much they have at stake if they make a poor choice and decide to drink and drive.

According to SALT, driving under the influence has far-reaching consequences including imprisonment, suspension of driving privileges, community service and thousands of dollars in fines.

For more information, visit http://www.navy.mil, http://www.facebook.com/usnavy, or http://www.twitter.com/usnavy.
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NNS130725-21. Newport NDAAC Counselors Promote Importance of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention

By Chief Mass Communication Specialist (AW/SW) Shawn D. Graham, Center for Service Support Public Affairs

NEWPORT, R.I. (NNS) — The Navy Drug and Alcohol Advisory Council (NDAAC) counselors at Naval Station (NAVSTA) Newport, R.I., provided educational information on alcohol and substance abuse for its members July 25.

NDAAC meets quarterly at the installation, bringing together department heads and health care providers to discuss alcohol abuse and prevention.

“This was an opportunity for the base’s tenant commands to share ideas, best practices and lessons learned,” said Chief Boatswain’s Mate (SW/AW) Jeffrey Olson, NAVSTA Newport port operations leading chief petty officer. “We must tackle this problem head-on, from a preventive perspective and not be reactive.”

NDAAC’s goal is to foster negative attitudes toward alcohol abuse and illicit drug use throughout the Newport Navy community

According to Chief Machinist’s Mate (SW/EXW/AW) Brian Bertolino, Center for Service Support’s (CSS) command drug and alcohol programs advisor (DAPA), substance abuse and dependence does not differentiate between Sailors or civilians.

“Alcohol and drug abuse is not a military problem or a civilian problem.” said Bertolino. “This problem extends beyond demographics. We must speak up and help Sailors keep what they’ve earned.”

The “Keep what you’ve earned,” campaign promotes responsible decisions by focusing on how much Sailors have accomplished during their careers with the Navy-therefore highlighting how much they have to lose.

“Bad decisions with alcohol or drugs can end your career very quickly,” said Bertolino. “As Sailors we have a duty and responsibility to look out for our brothers and sisters in the Navy. They are our shipmates, young or old, male or female. This problem can impact all areas of their personal and professional life.”

Bertolino also said Sailors should not be embarrassed to ask for help and commands should encourage them to seek counseling early.

“Help is only a phone call or an e-mail away if you or someone you know needs it,” said Bertolino. “An alcohol related incident (ARI) should not be the first step in receiving help. Most times the warning signs are loud and clear well before an incident occurs.”

Alcohol and drug abuse degrades mission readiness by leading to destructive behaviors, including motor vehicle and safety mishaps, sexual assaults, self-harm and poor fitness. These behaviors have far-reaching effects on Sailors, their commands and families.

For more news from Center for Service Support, visit http://www.navy.mil/local/css/.
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NNS130725-22. Industry, Navy Leaders Headline “IdeaFest: Hampton Roads”

From Navy Warfare Development Command Public Affairs

NORFOLK (NNS) — David Haygood, an expert in “design thinking” from IDEO, emerging leaders of the CNO’s Rapid Innovation Cell and Navy Type Commanders will speak at “IdeaFest: Hampton Roads,” July 31, at Navy Warfare Development Command headquarters on Naval Station Norfolk.

Spotlighting personnel on the deckplates and flightlines, IdeaFest: Hampton Roads intends to unlock the innovative potential of the Fleet through information sharing and brainstorming activities.

The event will also showcase Navy innovation resources to help Sailors contribute ideas that improve readiness or provide warfighting advantages.

Central to the event is the sharing of past innovation successes by Sailors whose ideas were adopted into the Fleet. These innovators will then moderate brainstorming sessions helping their peers develop and share rapid innovation across the force. The best ideas developed during the event will be brought forward to TYCOM leadership for implementation.

Haygood and his colleagues at IDEO helped redesign submarine combat system displays going from ideas to prototype in less than two months. He will be joined by Josh Smith of Johns Hopkins on a panel describing IDEO’s “design think” process.

IdeaFest: Hampton Roads participants will also compete in an innovation tournament conducted on the recently launched “CollabLab,” NWDC’s new online collaborative community.

Multiple winners will have an option of a tour of a fast-attack submarine, a trip to NASA’s Langley Fabrication Facility, and a “lesson” in an F-18 simulator.

For the complete agenda, registration and other information, visit https://www.nwdc.navy.mil/ncfi/WhatsNext/default.aspx.

IdeaFest: Hampton Roads is the kick-off to a long-term NWDC waterfront engagement campaign that includes live and virtual innovation tournaments and unit-level education and outreach efforts designed to identify, develop and gain leadership advocacy for innovative ideas coming from the Fleet.

Additional IdeaFest events will be held in other Fleet concentration areas.
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NNS130725-30. Pacific Partnership Hosts Disaster Response Workshop

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Samantha J. Webb

TARAWA, Republic of Kiribati (NNS) — National emergency managers and disaster response organization representatives from the Republic of Kiribati joined Pacific Partnership personnel for a disaster response workshop at the Kiribati Parliament, July 25.

More than 20 participants attended the day-long event consisting of presentations and panel discussions from nine experts representing the nations of Australia, Canada, Kiribati, New Zealand and the U.S.

The goal of the workshop was to discuss disaster response roles and increase collaboration between countries and organizations that would possibly respond in the event of a disaster affecting the nation of 32 low-lying atolls in the Pacific Ocean.

Although no major disasters have happened in Kiribati in recent years, Akoia Kietau, a Kiribati representative from UNICEF, said she considers the workshop important and worthwhile.

“We haven’t come across any big emergencies or disasters, but it’s better to be trained just in case,” said Kietau. “The presentations this morning on preparedness were very helpful to me.”

Presenters covered topics such as civilian response stakeholder roles and responsibilities, the UN cluster approach to disaster response, the Kiribati Red Cross disaster plan overview, World Health Organization roles and responsibilities, the Kiribati national response plan and post disaster infrastructure assessment.

Educating the leadership in Kiribati about the availability of international coordination for disaster response is important to do face-to-face, said Canadian Forces Army Capt. Jean-Martin Brault.

“It’s important to build ties,” said Brault. “Eventually if we meet again things are easier because we already know each other.”

A panel of representatives from civilian and military entities in Australia, New Zealand and the U.S. described their respective capabilities in responding to a disaster in Kiribati and then answered questions from the group.

Several questions surrounded shortage of rainfall and thus shortage of drinking water, the seemingly most relevant possible disaster for the approximately 100,000 residents of Kiribati.

Panelists said the goal should always be to take preventive measures before a problem, like a shortage of drinking water, is elevated to the level of a disaster.

Throughout the 11 days Pacific Partnership members worked in Tarawa, several water catchment systems were assessed and 30 biosand filters were donated to schools, clinics and community centers to provide healthy drinking water for more than 11,000 people.

The majority of the workshop focused on collaborating and organizing efforts between nations who each bring unique skill sets needed in a disaster such as transportation, communication, logistics, healthcare, food, drinking water and shelter.

“In the modern world when smaller nations face major disasters, many nations want to help, but that help needs to be coordinated,” said Australian Army Capt. Kendall Crocker, a civil affairs officer familiar with small island nations in the Pacific Ocean. “We need to have these cooperative exercises so that we better understand what each of us brings to the table.”

Pacific Partnership 2013 is a collaborative effort of military members and civilians from 10 partner nations including Australia, Canada, Colombia, France, Japan, Malaysia, Singapore, South Korea, New Zealand and the United States that improves maritime security through disaster preparedness.

For more information, visit http://www.navy.mil, http://www.facebook.com/usnavy, or http://www.twitter.com/usnavy.
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NNS130725-13. Naval Hospital Jacksonville Provides Mentorship to High School Students

By Yan Kennon, Naval Hospital Jacksonville Public Affairs Senior Writer

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (NNS) — Students from Darnell-Cookman Middle/High School of the Medical Arts participated in a week-long training course at Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville, July 15-19, as part of the hospital’s Science, Service, Medicine and Mentoring (S2M2) program.

Ten students participated in the intense five-day outreach program that included panel discussions, hands-on medical applications, workshops, job shadowing and engagement with NH Jacksonville clinicians (physicians, surgeons, nurses, physician assistants, pharmacists and psychologists).

“Your selection to our S2M2 program speaks to your commitment and passion for the medical profession,” said Capt. Gayle Shaffer, NH Jacksonville commanding officer during opening remarks to the students. “Being a part of medicine can be one of the most rewarding things you can ever achieve in your lifetime. And if you choose military medicine, you’ll have the added opportunity of providing battlefield, disaster and humanitarian care around the world.”

The students received real-world experience in patient care areas-from the operating room and emergency department to pharmacy and physical/occupational therapy.

“It was absolutely fun to have the opportunity to simulate stabilizing broken bones through external fixation, and immobilizing bones through internal fixation,” said Tiffany Hoeckelberg, a Darnell-Cookman junior. “My goal is to apply for the Naval Academy next year, and pursue a career as a Navy orthopedic surgeon.”

The goal of NH Jacksonville’s S2M2 program is to encourage, nurture, and enhance high school students’ commitment to science and medicine in a welcoming and intellectually stimulating environment. The S2M2 partnership with Darnell-Cookman complements the school’s focus on equipping high-performing students with the skills and experiences to pursue advanced medical degrees.

“I have always been interested in medicine, and my goal is to work in the field of neurology,” said Rory Peterson, a Darnell-Cookman junior. “My passion was further excited when I was allowed to job-shadow one of the neuroradiologists, who shared his knowledge and expertise with me. This experience has brought my dream of becoming a physician one step closer to reality.”

Developed in 2004 by the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, the S2M2 program is designed to grow the next generation of health care professionals by nurturing high school students’ commitment to science and medicine.

NH Jacksonville’s priority since its founding in 1941 is to heal the nation’s heroes and their families. The command is comprised of the Navy’s fourth largest hospital and five branch health clinics across Florida and Georgia. Of its patient population-about 163,000 active and retired Sailors, Soldiers, Marines, Airmen, National Guardsmen and their families-more than 57,000 are enrolled with a primary care manager at one of its facilities.

For more news from Naval Hospital Jacksonville, visit http://www.navy.mil/local/nhjax/.
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NNS130725-10. SEALs and SWCCs Support National Boy Scout Jamboree

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Meranda Keller, Naval Special Warfare Group 2 Public Affairs

BECTHEL SUMMIT, W.Va. (NNS) — Members of the Navy SEAL and Special Warfare Combatant-Craft Crewman Scout Team attended the first National Scout Jamboree 2013 held at Summit Bechtel Reserve in West Virginia, July 15-24.

SEAL and SWCC Sailors supported the National Scout Jamboree in an effort to promote Naval Special Warfare awareness and conduct a Physical Screening Test in connection with earning the first brand new Summit SEAL Challenge award for fitness.

To earn the Summit SEAL Challenge award for fitness there are several things to be completed. Any scout to achieve the rank of Star, Life or Eagle may earn this new uniform patch. First, they must have the citizenship in the nation, personal fitness, swimming and lifesaving or have earned the Venture Ranger award merit badges.

According to David W. Roberts, senior innovation manager for Boy Scouts of America, during the Jamboree the Canopy Tour, bows, barrels, rope challenge course, climbing skills, mariner adventure or mountain biking curriculum courses need to be completed. The final evolution to achieve this patch is to pass the Navy SEAL Physical Fitness Test (PST).

Special Warfare Operator Chief James Jackson said, “This strength and endurance test consists of a 500 yard swim in 12:30 or less, 50 sit-ups, 50 push ups, 10 pull-ups and a mile and a half run in 10:30 or less.”

“The decisions to keep the PST the same as the real SEAL standard came from a panel of SEALs who are Eagle scouts,” said Capt. Duncan Smith, commanding officer, Naval Special Warfare Recruiting Directorate. “Both Officer and enlisted SEALS chaired the panel and the decision was backed by Admiral Sean Pybus, the former commander of Naval Special Warfare Command.”

SEAL and SWCC Sailors, who served as mentors, conducted a pull-up challenge for the athletes and attendees during the jamboree. They also brought the Special Operations Craft-Riverine a high-speed boat with ample weapons and equipment capabilities, allowing attendees to climb on board and ask any question they had about SEAL and SWCC.

“We were told by two sources the Summit SEAL Challenge was the most popular event at the jamboree,” said Smith.

More than 500 Scouts pre-registered online before 15 June. 237 showed up to the challenge, and 46 Scouts passed the challenge to receive the Summit SEAL Challenge award.

“The guys who didn’t pass got upset, but I told them it took me four tries before I passed it. I am a SEAL today though because I kept putting one foot in front of the other and working at it,” said Special Warfare Operator 1st Class Justin Smith.

“I found the test to be very difficult even after training for it for six weeks” said 18-year-old Griffin St. Louis after completing the PST.

The event gave participants a chance to interact with SEAL and SWCC operators. The National Scout Jamboree 2013 held at Summit Bechtel Reserve in West Virginia came to close with the SEAL and SWCC operators giving the Scouts a brief on mental toughness, physical fitness, setting goals and achieving them, and teamwork.

For more news from Naval Special Warfare Group 2, visit http://www.navy.mil/local/nswgtwo/.
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NNS130725-06. Lincoln Leads the Way in Hearing Conservation

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Zachary A. Anderson

NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS) — The Office of Naval Research together with the Uniformed Services University’s department of preventive medicine and biometrics began using the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) July 15 as a test platform to study the effects of 24 hour noise exposure on Sailors.

The study will span two years and will measure the noise exposure of Sailors attached to aircraft carriers and amphibious assault ships while on deployment and in the shipyards.

According to Cmdr. Michael Stevens, assistant professor at the Uniformed Services University, the goal of the study is to accurately identify the amount of harmful noise Sailors are exposed to in different environments.

“We are trying to get better data to help fight hearing loss,” said Cmdr. Jennifer Rous, assistant professor at the Uniformed Services University. “Hearing loss costs the Department of Defense billions each year.”

Lincoln will be able to use the information gathered to improve working conditions, according to the ships assistant safety officer Lt. John Engel.

“The Safety Department is going to be able to use this information to raise the level of safety on the ship,” said Engel. “We will be able to better tailor the level of personal protection equipment worn to individual tasks and environments to better protect our Sailors, along with increasing the effectiveness of our training program.”

The research team aboard Lincoln is using a new device to measure noise in decibels and record it for analysis.
“The device has three microphones,” said Stevens. “One microphone records the ambient noise in the area of the Sailor; the other two microphones are inside foam earplugs and measure the noise that makes it past the hearing protection used by the Sailor.”

Measuring the amount of ambient noise on the ship and the amount of noise in the Sailor’s ears not only lets the researchers know how noisy an area is, but how effective the protection being worn is.

“The ultimate goal of our research is to identify specific tasks that are always loud so we can work with ship designers to build quieter ships,” said Rous.

For more news from USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72), visit http://www.navy.mil/local/cvn72/.
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NNS130725-20. Vice Adm. Branch Takes Charge of Information Dominance and Naval Intelligence

By Joe Gradisher, Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Information Dominance Public Affairs

WASHINGTON (NNS) — Vice Adm. Ted N. Branch assumed the duties of the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (DCNO) for Information Dominance (N2/N6) and Director of Naval Intelligence (DNI) during a change-of-charge ceremony at the Pentagon July 25.

Branch succeeds Vice Adm. Kendall L. Card, who will retire following a distinguished 35-year naval career. Card assumed office as the DCNO for Information Dominance and the 64th Director of Naval Intelligence in June of 2011.

N2/N6 is the Navy’s lead office for resourcing Intelligence, Cyber Warfare, Command and Control, Electronic Warfare, Battle Management, Oceanography and Meteorology capabilities, among others. The office’s mission is to deliver end-to-end accountability for Navy information requirements, investments, capabilities, and forces.

As DCNO, Card also directed the efforts of the more than 52,000 military and civilian professionals who comprise the Information Dominance Corps and provide warfare commanders with Assured Command and Control, Battlespace Awareness, and Integrated Fires.

“It has been the highlight of my career to lead the N2/N6 team and Information Dominance community as we face the challenges of the information age,” said Card. “I’ve been humbled by the dedication and creativity of the members of our team as they have blazed new trails into the Navy’s future.”

Card is a native of Fort Stockton, Texas. He earned a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering from Vanderbilt University in December 1977 and holds a master’s degree in National Security and Strategic Studies from U.S. Naval War College. He is also a graduate of U.S. Naval Test Pilot School.

He is a career naval aviator with more than 3,900 flight hours in the SH-3H Sea King, SH-60F Seahawk, and S-3A Viking aircraft. He has commanded Helicopter Antisubmarine Squadron 15, USS Rainier (AOE 7), and USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72).

As a flag officer, Card has served as director, Command and Control Systems, North American Aerospace Defense Command and U.S. Northern Command J6; commander, task forces 51/58/59/151/158, Manama Bahrain; and commander, Expeditionary Strike Group 3.

He was the Director of Concepts, Strategies and Integration for Information Dominance on the N2/N6 staff prior to becoming the DCNO.

Before assuming the mantle of DCNO/DNI, Branch served as Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic Fleet, based in Norfolk, Va. Naval Air Force Atlantic is composed of more than 40,000 men and women who maintain and operate five aircraft carriers, 80 aircraft squadrons flying 1,000 aircraft, and a number of supporting shore facilities providing combat-ready air forces to commanders operating from the North Pole to the Antarctic, and from the East Coast of the U.S. to the Indian Ocean.

Branch, a native of Long Beach, Miss., graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1979 and earned a master’s degree in International Relations from the Naval War College in Newport, R.I.

A career naval aviator, his operational assignments include Light Attack Squadrons 15 and 37, USS Forrestal (CV 59), and Strike Fighter Squadron 37. He served as executive and commanding officer of Strike Fighter Squadron 15, executive officer in USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74), commanding officer in USS Coronado (AGF 11) and USS Nimitz (CVN 68), and commander of Carrier Strike Group 1/Carl Vinson Strike Group. During those tours, Branch deployed with both the Atlantic and Pacific Fleets and has logged combat time in A-7 Corsairs and F/A-18 Hornets over Grenada, Lebanon, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and Iraq. He participated in Operations Urgent Fury, Earnest Will, Southern Watch, Deliberate Force, Iraqi Freedom, and led the initial Navy efforts for Haiti earthquake relief in Operation Unified Response.

Ashore, Branch has served as an instructor in the A-7 and F/A-18 Fleet Replacement Squadrons, the Joint Staff in Washington, completed Navy Nuclear Power Training, served as executive assistant to the commander U.S. Pacific Fleet, and as director of Operations and Plans (N31) on the chief of Naval Operations staff in Washington.

Branch’s decorations include the Legion of Merit, Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Meritorious Service Medal, Strike Flight Air Medal, Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal with Combat “V”, Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal, and various unit and campaign awards.

“It is an honor and a privilege for me to assume these duties,” said Branch. “I look forward to leading the N2/N6 team and the Information Dominance Corps as we evolve and develop this new way of warfare.”

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NNS130725-07. Submarine School Holds Changes of Command

From Submarine Learning Center Public Affairs

GROTON, Conn. (NNS) — Naval Submarine School held a change of command ceremony July 19, at Naval Submarine Base New London.

During the ceremony Capt. Andrew Jarrett relieved Capt. David Roberts as commanding officer.

Rear Adm. David Johnson, Program Executive Officer for Submarines, presented Roberts with the Legion of Merit medal for the work he’d done leading the school charged with training the Navy’s undersea specialists.

“What do you say when turning over the best major command in the submarine force? What do you say to the hundreds of people who make this small university function at such a high level every day or to the thousands of students who walk its campus every day,” said Roberts. “Naval Submarine School is unlike any place I’ve ever served and I’m a better naval officer and a better person because of this experience.”

Roberts took command of Naval Submarine School August of 2011 and will assume command of the Submarine Learning Center in August.

Speaking to an audience overflowing with family, friends and shipmates, Roberts thanked them for their support, while telling how during his tenure at the school he grew personally and professionally

“The complexity of submarining, and the high operational demand for submarines to conduct missions around the world, requires the highest quality Sailors the Navy has to offer,” he said. “If we aren’t making the next generation better, we are failing the fleet. We take this very seriously at Naval Submarine School.”

Jarrett’s previous assignment was as deputy commandant of Midshipmen at the United States Naval Academy. He graduated from the Naval Academy in 1989 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering. Following nuclear power and submarine training, he reported to USS Alexander Hamilton (SSBN 617) where he qualified in submarines and as a nuclear engineering officer.

He has also served aboard USS Henry M. Jackson (SSBN 730), completing two strategic patrols. While assigned to USS Minneapolis-Saint Paul (SSN 708) he was the navigation/operations officer and completed two North Atlantic deployments and a Mediterranean deployment, followed by a tour as as commanding officer of USS Pittsburgh (SSN-720).

“Capt. Roberts instituted fundamental changes to initial accession training, dramatically improving the quality of Sailors and officers delivered to the fleet. His direct involvement in preparing 21 submarine crews from four squadrons to conduct submarine operations worldwide resulted in improved performance and contributed to the success of missions vital to national security,” Jarrett said. “I’m humbled by all the Sub School commanding officers who have gone before me. These men knew the vital importance of a strong training program for submariners and their legacy of superior teaching and learning continues today as the foundation of our submarines’ operational success.”

Jarrett concluded his remarks by saying that the training center has the best staff in the Navy and he is excited to lead them.

“To my new team, I look forward to serving as your captain and promise to give you and the school my best effort. I ask only that you continue giving your best as we teach and mentor the next generation of submariners.”

For more information about Naval Submarine School, visit https://www.netc.navy.mil/centers/slc/nss/.

For more news from Naval Education and Training Command, visit http://www.navy.mil/local/cnet/.
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NNS130725-05. Former USS Solace Survivor Laid to Rest

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Tiarra Fulgham, Navy Public Affairs Support Element West, Detachment Hawaii

PEARL HARBOR (NNS) — A Pearl Harbor survivor was laid to rest during an ash scattering ceremony at the USS Utah Memorial on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam July 24.

Family members of Yeoman 1st Class Alphonse “Al” Vanden Brul scattered his remains, along with a portion of his late wife’s, into the harbor where he will be reunited with shipmates who lost their lives during the Japanese attacks on Pearl Harbor.

Pearl Harbor Survivors liaison, Jim Taylor, started the ceremony by giving a short overview of Vanden Brul’s life.
Al, along with his twin brother John, was born Nov. 28, 1918 during a flu epidemic in Rochester, N.Y. and later both joined the Navy Reserve at the age of 17. Due to the approaching war the brothers were called to active duty in April 1941.

In June 1941 Vanden Brul and his brother were sent to join the Navy’s newest ship USS Solace (AH-5), a hospital ship stationed out of Pearl Harbor.

During the morning of the attacks he was assigned to duties in the laundry room. As he was getting ready to head out for church, some of the nurses onboard looked out of the ship and saw USS Utah get hit and roll over.

Later that day boats were pulling alongside the Solace with casualties, some alive and others dead. His job was to put his living shipmates into hospital beds and take the deceased to the stern of the ship to be identified later, along with the gruesome burning of blood drenched bed sheets.

“Vanden Brul family is quite amazing, four brothers in the Navy during World War II,” said Jim Taylor. “Herbert earned a degree in law after leaving the Navy, Robert actually retired from the Navy, John and Al worked at Eastman Kodak after receiving their honorable discharges and retired in the early 1980s.”

Alphonse passed away May 29, 2013. Family members recalled Vanden Brul always talking about the attacks Dec. 7, 1941, particularly during the last few years of his life, which is the reason they returned his remains to one of the attack sites.

“Al would tell you he was not a hero; he was simply doing his job as everyone was expected to do, nothing more, nothing less” said Capt. Lawrence Scruggs, deputy commander of Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility “He embodies the spirit and tradition of our rich Navy, his life is an inspiration to us in this time of war and challenge. I stand here today to say, shipmate…we have the watch.”

Family members including his daughters attended the ceremony which included a presentation of a flag flown over the memorial, playing of taps, and a three-volley rifle salute by the Pearl Harbor Honors and Ceremonial Guard.

For more information, visit http://www.navy.mil, http://www.facebook.com/usnavy, or http://www.twitter.com/usnavy.
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NNS130725-26. Naval Academy Sailor Receives Purple Heart

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Alexia Riveracorrea, U.S. Naval Academy Public Affairs

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (NNS) — The commander of Navy Medicine for the National Capital area awarded the Purple Heart to a Naval Academy Sailor during a ceremony at the Naval Health Clinic in Annapolis, Md., July 24.

Rear Adm. Alton Stocks presented the award to Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class (FMF) Michael Couch for wounds sustained in Afghanistan in 2011.

Couch, of Carrollton, Ga., was supporting the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit in Afghanistan when his convoy was hit by an 80-pound pressure-plated improvised explosive device.

“I don’t remember much, but my medical report stated that I experienced a ruptured ear drum and loss of consciousness that lasted six minutes,” said Couch. “Our vehicle was destroyed but I managed to keep myself and my Marines alive.”

Couch was immediately taken to the hospital for treatment.

“After my three-week therapy I went back out with my battalion and finished my deployment with them,” he said.

During the ceremony, Couch recognized the contributions of his family, friends and fellow service members.

“I have tons of support from my family, friends and the Marines I served with,” he said. “This award represents the men I was with, and I am honored to wear this medal for them.”

As a jospital corpsman, Couch is accustomed to taking care of others rather than the other way around.

“A lot of times I was the only corpsman on site and everyone relied on me,” he said. “I had to put all my problems aside and take care of my patients. That’s why I became a corpsman.”

The experience hasn’t dented Couch’s desire to serve with the Marines again, hopefully as a doctor, he said.

“I am working on putting together a package for the Seaman to Admiral commissioning program, and I hope I get picked up next year,” said Couch. “My ultimate goal is to be a battalion surgeon. I would love to go back with the Marines.”

The Purple Heart is the oldest military decoration still awarded. It was originally called the Badge of Military Merit and was established by Gen. George Washington during the American Revolution.

For more news from U.S. Naval Academy, visit http://www.navy.mil/local/usna/.
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NNS130725-15. Obangame Express 2014 Planning Commences in Ghana

From Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa/U.S. 6th Fleet Public Affairs

ACCRA, Ghana (NNS) — Gulf of Guinea nations held a planning conference July 23-25 to set in motion objectives and initial concepts for what will be the fourth iteration of Obangame Express, a multinational maritime exercise which is set to take place in spring 2014.

Obangame Express, one of four major U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa/U.S. 6th Fleet exercises in Africa, focuses on addressing common maritime issues through information sharing and coordinated operations among Gulf of Guinea navies.

Planning conference participants were welcomed to the conference by Ghana navy’s chief of naval staff and the U.S. naval attache to Ghana, Togo and Benin. Both leaders emphasized the importance of cooperation and working together to ensure security at sea.

“I urge participating countries to own this process of cooperation,” said Rear Adm. Geoffrey Mawuli Biekro, Ghana navy chief of staff. “The need for maritime security has increased. With the present state of affairs, the need for cooperation, especially within Obangame Express, cannot be over-emphasized.”

The emphasis was also placed on utilizing already existing partnerships and infrastructure for greater cooperation.
“Obangame Express is now in its fourth year and we are building on cooperation and trust,” said Cmdr. John Koon, naval attache to Ghana, Togo and Benin. “Maritime cooperation has recently been formalized and so have plans for a regional operation center. The next step is execution and Obangame Express will develop the interoperability between Gulf of Guinea countries to enhance maritime security in this region.”

Held in Doula, Cameroon in February, Obangame Express 2013 brought together 12 ships from 10 countries to train on a number of maritime scenarios.

Obangame Express 2014 seeks to mirror the results of the most recent exercise, tailoring training even more closely to real-world events that have occurred this year.
In the wake of recent piracy events in the Gulf of Guinea, all conference participants acknowledge that combating maritime threats cannot be a unilateral effort.

“The maritime threat requires a regional solution and regional cooperation,” said Lt. Cmdr. Jean Lackmata, a planning officer serving at the Cameroon navy headquarters. “It is only when assets are combined in joint operations that we can address the threats. And we hope to exercise these types of operations in Obangame Express.”

Participating countries in the planning conference include Belgium, Benin, Brazil, Cameroon, Cote d’Ivorie, Gabon, Nigeria, Republic of Congo, Togo, and the United States.

For more news from Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe and Africa/U.S. 6th Fleet, visit http://www.navy.mil/local/naveur/.
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NNS130725-08. NAVFAC Networks to Provide Business Opportunities in the 11th Annual Hawaii Small Business Forum

By Krista K. Catian, Naval Facilities Engineering Command Pacific Public Affairs

PEARL HARBOR (NNS) — Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Pacific and NAVFAC Hawaii participated in a small business industry forum hosted by the Honolulu Minority Business Development Agency (MBDA) July 23 at the Honolulu Country Club.

“The annual Hawaii Small Business Forum provides a positive learning environment for NAVFAC and our small business professionals to actively engage with the small business community in Hawaii,” said NAVFAC Pacific Commander Rear Adm. Bret Muilenburg.

More than 250 people attended the 11th annual forum where small businesses are invited to learn about contracting opportunities within the local area.

NAVFAC Pacific Guam Program Management Officer Cmdr. Keith Barton provided status on small business utilization to support the Guam realignment program.

“Our small business community provides excellent support to the program,” said Barton. “There’s roughly an even split between the number of projects we awarded to small business and those that have gone to large business in the Guam realignment. We believe that by separating out smaller portions of larger construction contracts or identifying smaller projects, we’ll continue to create collaboration and perform well in this regard.”

NAVFAC Hawaii Executive Officer Capt. Ed Sewester served as a panel member on the upcoming planned procurements session.

“Small businesses are a big part of our family to make things happen for the Navy,” said Sewester. “It has been a trend over the past three to five years where 40 to 50 percent of NAVFAC Hawaii’s volume of business has been awarded to small business. We take it seriously, we abide by the laws, and we put tools in place to provide opportunities to small businesses.”

NAVFAC Pacific Deputy Director for Small Business Jennifer McGuire, NAVFAC Hawaii Assistant Deputy Director for Small Business Lisa Roth, NAVFAC Pacific Contracting Officer Richard Keener, and NAVFAC Hawaii Contracting Officer’s Lynne Morita and Wayne Jyo conducted match-making sessions that included one-on-one discussions with contractors.

“The match-making sessions and one-on-one discussions are a crucial part of this forum as it provides small businesses the opportunity to learn how to successfully do business with the government during this fiscally challenging time,” said McGuire. “It also serves as a great forum to listen, learn and network.”

This year marks the 50-year celebration to honor America’s 27 million small businesses. Small businesses include service disabled veteran-owned small business, historically underutilized business zone small business, small disadvantaged business, and women-owned small business concerns.

For more news from Naval Facilities Engineering Command, visit http://www.navy.mil/local/navfachq/.

NNS130725-18. Current All Hands Update

From Defense Media Activity – Navy

WASHINGTON (NNS) — All Hands Update features five newscasts today – three one-minute newscasts and two packages uploaded for web broadcast.

First One-minute newscast-
– Headline for Thursday, July 25, 2013: FLTCM April Beldo Discusses Post 9/11 G.I. Bill Transferability
http://www.navy.mil/viewVideo.asp?id=18693

Second one-minute newscast-
– Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 25 Volunteers at Guam High School
http://www.navy.mil/viewVideo.asp?id=18694

Third one-minute newscast-
– Jacksonville High School Students Learn About Medicine Through Naval Hospital Mentor Program
http://www.navy.mil/viewVideo.asp?id=18695

Web newscast-
– George Washington Welcomes Visitors From Australia
http://www.navy.mil/viewVideo.asp?id=18689

Web newscast-
– George Washington Sailors Complete Security Force Reaction Training
http://www.navy.mil/viewVideo.asp?id=18692

Defense Media Activity – Navy usually produces four All Hands Update (AHU)newscasts each day – one two-minute newscast and three one-minute newscasts. AHU can be seen throughout the day and evening on the Direct-to-Sailor (DTS)satellite television service available aboard 160 ships of the fleet and via the Navy Web site at http://www.navy.mil. Check your local DTS program schedule for air times. AHU can also be seen throughout the world on the American Forces Radio and Television Service (AFRTS).
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NNS020718-15. This Day in Naval History – July 25

From the Naval News Service

1779 – Amphibious expedition against British in Penobscot Bay, Me.
1863 – U.S. Squadron bombards Fort Wagner, N.C.
1866 – Rank of Admiral created. David G. Farragut is appointed the first Admiral in the U.S. Navy.
1898 – Landing party from armed yacht Gloucester occupies Guanica, Puerto Rico.
1912 – First specifications for naval aircraft published.
1934 – First President to visit Hawaii, Franklin D. Roosevelt, reaches Hilo on board USS Houston (CA 30).
1941 – Bureau of Ordnance issues first Navy “E”certificates (for excellence) for industry.
1943 – Launching of USS Harmon (DE 72), first ship named for an African-American.
1990 – USS Cimarron (AO 177) rescues 25 refugees adrift southeast of Subic Bay, Philippines.

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Navy News Service is the official news wire service of the U.S. Navy, containing stories recently posted to the Navy Web site at http://www.navy.mil. It is a product of the Defense Media Navy – 6700 Taylor Rd., Fort Meade, MD 20755. Reprints should be credited to the Navy News Service (NNS).

For the latest in Navy news from around the fleet, visit http://www.navy.mil.

For all Navy-related questions, review the FAQs posted at http://www.navy.mil or visit http://www.history.navy.mil.

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Current All Hands Update
Story Number: NNS130725-18Release Date: 7/25/2013 11:17:00 AM

WASHINGTON (NNS) — All Hands Update features five newscasts today – three one-minute newscasts and two packages uploaded for web broadcast.
————————————————————————————————————–
First One-minute newscast-
– Headline for Thursday, July 25, 2013: FLTCM April Beldo Discusses Post 9/11 G.I. Bill Transferability
http://www.navy.mil/viewVideo.asp?id=18693

—————————————————————————————————————

Second one-minute newscast-
– Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 25 Volunteers at Guam High School
http://www.navy.mil/viewVideo.asp?id=18694

—————————————————————————————————————
Third one-minute newscast-
– Jacksonville High School Students Learn About Medicine Through Naval Hospital Mentor Program
http://www.navy.mil/viewVideo.asp?id=18695

————————————————————————————————————–
Web newscast-
– George Washington Welcomes Visitors From Australia
http://www.navy.mil/viewVideo.asp?id=18689

—————————————————————————————————————-
Web newscast-
– George Washington Sailors Complete Security Force Reaction Training
http://www.navy.mil/viewVideo.asp?id=18692

—————————————————————————————————————-
Defense Media Activity – Navy usually produces four All Hands Update (AHU)newscasts each day – one two-minute newscast and three one-minute newscasts. AHU can be seen throughout the day and evening on the Direct-to-Sailor (DTS)satellite television service available aboard 160 ships of the fleet and via the Navy Web site at http://www.navy.mil. Check your local DTS program schedule for air times. AHU can also be seen throughout the world on the American Forces Radio and Television Service (AFRTS).

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